Randwick City Library’s eBook collection

18 03 2010

To my surprise, the Randwick City Library in Sydney actually has a Digital Library website which allows you to borrow ebooks. Currently, the library only supports Adobe® PDF eBooks but it's a great start. There is also a good range of audio books.

To borrow an ebook, you will need to download and install Adobe® Digital Editions and have a library card. The best thing about it is that you will never accrue late fees because the ebook will automatically expire at the end of the loan period. The library is also open 24/7.

One might argue that there isn't a market for ebook loans since they are fairly cheap to download. Amazon sells Kindle ebooks for around the USD $10 dollar mark, and you can even get your hands on top sellers for $2.00. If libraries in the future have a wide range of ebooks for different devices, I can see this really taking off. Why pay for an ebook if you can borrow one for free? And if you're an ebook addict like me, it can get costly.

It's great to see the Randwick City Library embrace the digital era which leads me to the question, what will the local library look like 5 to 10 years from now? If ebook loans take off, will the sense of community which libraries foster soon disappear? Or will less book shelves give libraries more space, resources and opportunities to build more community?

You can check out the Randwick City Digital Library here.

Posted via email from Fairfax Digital UX Blog

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Mobile App Marketplace: $17.5 Billion by 2012

18 03 2010

For those of us who are addicted to downloading mobile apps, we know it's going to be big. But how big? Mobile application store operator, GetJar, recently commissioned a study to answer this question and the stats are astounding.

  • The annual growth rate for mobile app downloads is 92%
  • By 2012, off-deck, paid apps will be the biggest source of revenue
  • In 2009, mobile operators accounted for more than 60% of apps' revenue
  • By 2012, mobile operators will account for less than 23% of apps' revenue
  • The app store growth (8 to 38 by 2012) is an increase of 375%
  • Revenue opportunities in Europe will grow from $1.5 billion in 2009 to $8.5 billion in 2012
  • Revenue opportunities in North America will grow from $2.1 billion to around $6.7 billion in 2012
  • Apps are most popular in Asia where they account for 37% of global downloads this past year
  • Users spent the most for apps in North America where they account for over 50% of revenue

And the iPad hasn't even hit the market yet.

Posted via email from Fairfax Digital UX Blog





Mobile App Marketplace: $17.5 Billion by 2012

18 03 2010

For those of us who are addicted to downloading mobile apps, we know it’s going to be big. But how big? Mobile application store operator, GetJar, recently commissioned a study to answer this question and the stats are astounding:

* The annual growth rate for mobile app downloads is 92%
* By 2012, off-deck, paid apps will be the biggest source of revenue
* In 2009, mobile operators accounted for more than 60% of apps’ revenue
* By 2012, mobile operators will account for less than 23% of apps’ revenue
* The app store growth (8 to 38 by 2012) is an increase of 375%
* Revenue opportunities in Europe will grow from $1.5 billion in 2009 to $8.5 billion in 2012
* Revenue opportunities in North America will grow from $2.1 billion to around $6.7 billion in 2012
* Apps are most popular in Asia where they account for 37% of global downloads this past year
* Users spent the most for apps in North America where they account for over 50% of revenue

And the iPad hasn’t even hit the market yet.





Findings: Inaccessible content at Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca

17 03 2010

Accessibility advocate, Joe Clark, examined 2 Paralympic Winter Games sites, Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca and found that both failed to meet basic accessibility standards. It is sadly ironic that the Winter Paralympic Games, which seeks to include people of all abilities and disabilities, have websites which are inaccessible to the very community which supports it.

We are not talking about just missing the mark and failing the highest level of web accessibility (Level AAA). These sites have actually failed to comply with the lowest basic level of accessibility.

Some of the accessibility issues found were:

  • Dozens of images do not have alternative text
  • Sites are not keyboard operable 
  • Flash content is not accessible
  • Videos are not captioned 

This is a lawsuit waiting to happen. In 1999, Bruce Maguire lodged a complaint against the Sydney Olympic Games official website because it was inaccessible to blind people and was awarded AUD $20,000.

Implementing an accessible site is not difficult. Including simple things like alternative text on images will improve the lives of many in more ways than you know, not to mention the SEO benefits of doing so.

Posted via email from Fairfax Digital UX Blog





Findings: Inaccessible content at Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca

17 03 2010

Accessibility advocate, Joe Clark, examined 2 Paralympic Winter Games sites, Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca and found that both failed to meet basic accessibility standards. It is sadly ironic that the Winter Paralympic Games, which seeks to include people of all abilities and disabilities, have websites which are inaccessible to the very community which supports it.

We are not talking about just missing the mark and failing the highest level of web accessibility (Level AAA). These sites have actually failed to comply with the lowest basic level of accessibility.

Some of the accessibility issues found were:

  • Dozens of images do not have alternative text
  • Sites are not keyboard operable 
  • Flash content is not accessible
  • Videos are not captioned 

This is a lawsuit waiting to happen. In 1999, Bruce Maguire lodged a complaint against the Sydney Olympic Games official website because it was inaccessible to blind people and was awarded AUD $20,000.

Implementing an accessible site is not difficult. Including simple things like alternative text on images will improve the lives of many in more ways than you know, not to mention the SEO benefits of doing so.

Posted via email from Accessite





Findings: Inaccessible content at Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca

17 03 2010

Accessibility advocate, Joe Clark, examined 2 Paralympic Winter Games sites, Vancouver2010.com and CTVOlympics.ca and found that both failed to meet basic accessibility standards. It is sadly ironic that the Winter Paralympic Games, which seeks to include people of all abilities and disabilities, have websites which are inaccessible to the very community which supports it.

We are not talking about just missing the mark and failing the highest level of web accessibility (Level AAA). These sites have actually failed to comply with the lowest basic level of accessibility.

Some of the accessibility issues found were:

  • Dozens of images do not have alternative text
  • Sites are not keyboard operable 
  • Flash content is not accessible
  • Videos are not captioned 

This is a lawsuit waiting to happen. In 1999, Bruce Maguire lodged a complaint against the Sydney Olympic Games official website because it was inaccessible to blind people and was awarded AUD $20,000.

Implementing an accessible site is not difficult. Including simple things like alternative text on images will improve the lives of many in more ways than you know, not to mention the SEO benefits of doing so.





Yum Cha – almost as bad as eating a Big Mac

12 03 2010

It just so happens that I'm meeting my in-laws for a yum cha brunch today and for some insane reason (why do I torture myself?), I decided to Google for nutritional information on our beloved dumplings. It's pretty depressing when you look at the figures. Gee, a 20 minute work out only burns enough calories for one steamed cha siew pau! And get this, one 'wu kok' (deep friend taro dumpling pictured above) has the same amount of fat as a Big Mac! Of course, it's not all bad if you stick to the really simple steamed stuff like shrimp dumpling (har Gau) or congee. But I know what you're thinking, it's not just the simple steamed stuff I want to feast on.

Of course, you've got to live life and enjoy these lovely culinary delights once in a while. What can I say…knowledge is power.

Siu Mai (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: One piece; Calories: 58, Total Fat: 3.8g, Carbs: 2.8g, Protein: 3.5g

Bbq Pork Buns, Steamed (1 Bun) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 Bun (56g bun, 9.42g pork); Calories: 150, Total Fat: 2.9g, Carbs: 26.7g, Protein: 4.3g

Shrimp Dumpling (har Gau) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: One shrimp dumpling; Calories: 44, Total Fat: 1g, Carbs: 5.3g, Protein: 3g

Steamed Shrimp Dumplings (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 dumpling; Calories: 120, Total Fat: 7, Carbs: 13, Protein: 2

Chicken Feet (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 215, Total Fat: 15g, Carbs: 0g, Protein: 19g

Turnip Cake (pan-fried) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 130, Total Fat: 5.7, Carbs: 16g, Protein: 3.2g

Steamed Barbecue Pork Bun (cha Siu Bao) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 260, Total Fat: 7.3g, Carbs: 42g, Protein: 7.3g

Steamed Shrimp Dumpling (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 dumpling (25gm); Calories: 35, Total Fat: 2g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: 1.5g

Sticky Rice Wrapped In Lotus Leaf (lo Mai Kay) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 210, Total Fat: 6.7g, Carbs: 30g, Protein: 7.6g

Steamed Shrimp Rice Roll (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: One plate; Calories: 75, Total Fat: 1.6g, Carbs: 12g, Protein: 2.9g

Chicken Bun Guy Bao (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 bun; Calories: 90, Total Fat: 1g, Carbs: 16g, Protein: 3gg

Deep Fried Taro Dumpling (wu Kok) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 360, Total Fat: 26g, Carbs: 26g, Protein: 6g

Steamed Rice Roll Filled With Beef (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: One plate; Calories: 83, Total Fat: 2.8g, Carbs: 12g, Protein:

Fried (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 piece; Calories: 100, Total Fat: 4g, Carbs: ?g, Protein:

Beef Tripe (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: one bowl; Calories: 348, Total Fat: 9.5g, Carbs: 12g, Protein: 0g

Fried Shrimp Ball (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 ball; Calories: 116, Total Fat: 1.8g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: 18.6g

Baked Bbq Pork Puff Pastry (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 440, Total Fat: 31g, Carbs: 31g, Protein: 8.9g

Fried Onion Pancake (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 Pancake (92g); Calories: 232, Total Fat: 6.5g, Carbs: 37.5g, Protein: 5.1g

Steamed Pork Ribs With Black Bean Sauce (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 220, Total Fat: 15g, Carbs: 6.3g, Protein: 14g

Deep Fried Meat Dumpling (ham Sui Kok) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 330, Total Fat: 16g, Carbs: 42g, Protein: 4.9g

Steamed Egg Custard Bun/sweet Milky Bun (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 250, Total Fat: 6.4g, Carbs: 44g, Protein: 4.3g

Salted Meat Sticky Rice (ham Yuk Chung) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 180, Total Fat: 6.7g, Carbs: 25g, Protein: 5.7g

Pan Fried Beancurd Sheet Roll (fu Pi Kuen) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100 g; Calories: 310, Total Fat: 26g, Carbs: 4.1g, Protein: 14g

Pork And Peanut Dumpling (fun Kor) (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 dumpling; Calories: 41, Total Fat: 1.3g, Carbs: 4.5g, Protein: 2.5g

Pork Congee With Preserved Egg (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 Cup; Calories: 208, Total Fat: 10g, Carbs: 16g, Protein: 13.6g

Steamed Bean Curd (tofu) Sheet Roll W/ Pork And Veg (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 260, Total Fat: 22g, Carbs: 3g, Protein: 11g

Steamed Minced Beef Ball (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 180, Total Fat: 14g, Carbs: 6g, Protein: 8g

Peanut Butter Stuff (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1/2 plate; Calories: 250, Total Fat: 5g, Carbs: 35g, Protein: 4g

Steamed Rice Roll W/ Pork (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 100g; Calories: 140, Total Fat: 6g, Carbs: 17g, Protein: 5g

Steamed Bbq Pork Buns (Dim Sum)
Serving Size: 1 bun; Calories: 150, Total Fat: 3g, Carbs: 27g, Protein: